Wondering how your tax dollars are being spent? Nashville unveils online project tracker

·2 min read
Nashville Department of Transportation crew works to replace a culvert on Brick Church Pike on August, 10, 2022.
Nashville Department of Transportation crew works to replace a culvert on Brick Church Pike on August, 10, 2022.

How long is that culvert repair going to take? When is the new community center going to open, or that new police precinct in southeast Nashville?

How exactly is Nashville spending taxpayers' money?

Nashville has over 800 capital projects underway equating to about $3.3 billion, and now there's a way for the public to track all of that.

The Neighborhood Improvement Tracker went live on Metro Nashville's website recently and plots all community safety, education, infrastructure and neighborhood projects on a county map.

"This is going to increase the accountability and transparency around these projects so that residents will know how their tax dollars are being spent," Mayor John Cooper said as he stood in front of a gap in the roadway on Brick Church Pike.

Mayor John Cooper announces a new online tool to track capital improvement projects across Davidson County.
Mayor John Cooper announces a new online tool to track capital improvement projects across Davidson County.

Crews behind Cooper worked Wednesday to lay concrete on a newly replaced culvert on Brick Church Pike outside Goodlettsville, one of the projects listed on the new tracker.

"Great cities have great neighborhoods," Cooper said. "For too long, Metro has really focused on downtown development and incentives for billion dollar corporations and not for what we are prioritizing for with the help of this council."

The tracker color codes each project and lists a location, what department the work falls under, an anticipated start date and an expected end date for the project. The tracker also says how much each project is budgeted to cost.

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Metro Councilman Zach Young, who represents the area where the culvert was being replaced, said he was excited for the new online tool.

"Someone living on this road might find it hard to believe that the money they pay in taxes is going toward things here in their own neighborhood," he said. "So this is a great way to really show folks that it's not just going to projects you see going up in the air but projects that are down below, too."

Contact Tennessean reporter Kirsten Fiscus at 615-259-8229 or KFiscus@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter @KDFiscus.

This article originally appeared on Nashville Tennessean: Nashville unveils online tracker for neighborhood improvement projects