Yoga is Denver’s hottest workout — here's how you can try it out

Photo: CorePower Yoga/Yelp

Does it seem like everyone’s talking about yoga these days? That’s because it’s the most popular type of fitness class in Denver right now, according to the fitness subscription service ClassPass.

But with so many yoga classes in the city, it can be hard to find the best one for you. So, Hoodline teamed up with ClassPass to find the top classes — those that consistently draw bigger crowds, yet still have enough space to meet the demand. And because variety is the spice of any workout routine, we’re bringing you offerings from multiple venues around Denver. 

If you’re ready to give this workout a try, here’s the info to help you find the right session, in the right place, on your terms.

Protip: Joining ClassPass gives you access to these and thousands of other studios, gyms and wellness offerings where you live, where you work and where you travel.

C2 - CorePower Yoga 2 at CorePower Yoga

3041 Zuni St., Highlands and other metro locations

PHOTO: COREPOWER YOGA/YELP

C2 “strengthens, balances and detoxifies your entire body and mind as you move through more challenging postures and connected breath,” CorePower Yoga writes on ClassPass. “Set to an energizing playlist, you’ll power up your yoga practice like never before.”

With an average class size of 15 — but accommodating up to 66 at peak times, according to ClassPass data — C2 is both a popular offering and one that you can still actually get into. 

First-timers alert: Plan to show up at least 10 minutes early. Most locations close the doors at the start of class, the studio writes on ClassPass, because the instructors who check in users also teach. Because it’s a yoga class, remember your mat, towel and water. CorePower Yoga studios offer mat and towel rentals, as well as bottles of water for purchase.

C2 is offered seven times each weekday and runs for one hour. Beat the rush by checking out the off-hours: the 5:30 a.m. and 9 a.m. starts are generally less crowded. See ClassPass to sign up — you can also learn more on Twitter and Facebook.

Vinyasa 1-2 at Kindness Yoga

1947 S. Broadway, Platt Park and other metro locations

PHOTO: KINDNESS YOGA/YELP

Vinyasa “will build your inner and outer strength, improve your balance, and reduce stress while increasing vitality and athleticism,” according to the ClassPass page for Kindness Yoga. “Most classes feature several elements of traditional Ashtanga yoga — including sun salutations, standing poses, preparation for arm balances, dynamic stretching, and pranayama (breathwork).”

An average class has 12 students, with the number growing to 39 at peak times. Vinyasa 1-2 is offered up to three times on weekdays at this location; the others vary. The 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. starting times are often less crowded, ClassPass data show.

What should you bring? The venue suggests a yoga mat and a water bottle, and to show up at least five minutes early.

To sign up for the one-hour class, visit the ClassPass site, and check out the venue on Instagram (kindnessyoga) and Facebook.

HPF - Hot Power Fusion at CorePower Yoga

5004 E Hampden Ave., University and other metro locations

PHOTO: COREPOWER YOGA/YELP

Another offering at CorePower Yoga locations, HPF blends balance, core strengthening and flexibility, the venue writes on ClassPass.

“Hot Power Fusion combines the meditative, detoxifying qualities of hot yoga with the intensity of power yoga to help you deepen your yoga practice,” CorePower Yoga notes. “Set to motivating music, you’ll focus on yoga postures that open the shoulders, hips and spine while strengthening your core and upper body.”

Pack a bottle of water, towel and a yoga mat. Suggested attire is fitted workout clothes, ideally ones that wick away moisture. Temperatures run 100-103 degrees, with added humidity.

HPF is offered three times each weekday at this and other locations, with an average class size of 10. The 3:30 start time is often less crowded, according to ClassPass data. To book a spot, visit the ClassPass site.

Hoodline, a Nextdoor company, offers data-driven analysis of local happenings and trends across cities and neighborhoods. Links included in this article may earn Hoodline a commission on clicks and transactions.