New York Post reporter resigns, saying she was 'ordered' to write 'incorrect' story on Kamala Harris' book at a migrant shelter

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Eliza Relman
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Fading Page 1 editions of the New York Post are pasted on the wall of the press room in the State Supreme Court building, also known as 100 Centre St., Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • A New York Post reporter who authored a story falsely claiming that migrant children were being given copies of Kamala Harris' children's book resigned Tuesday.

  • The reporter, Laura Italiano, said that she'd been "ordered" to write the "incorrect" story and had reached her "breaking point."

  • The Post temporarily deleted Italiano's two stories on the topic and republished altered versions hours later with editor's notes.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

A New York Post reporter who authored a story falsely claiming that migrant children were being given copies of Vice President Kamala Harris' children's book announced on Tuesday that she'd been "ordered" to write the "incorrect" story and resigned from the paper.

Earlier on Tuesday, the Post temporarily deleted Italiano's two stories on the topic and republished altered versions hours later with editor's notes.

"An announcement: Today I handed in my resignation to my editors at the New York Post," Laura Italiano tweeted on Tuesday evening. "The Kamala Harris story - an incorrect story I was ordered to write and which I failed to push back hard enough against - was my breaking point."

Italiano's cover story last Friday titled, "Kam On In: Solo kids at border welcomed with copy of veep's book," falsely reported that migrant children were provided with "welcome kits" that included Harris' 2019 book. The story was void of evidence supporting that claim, which appeared entirely based on a Reuters photo showing a single copy of the book propped against a backpack on a table at the Long Beach, California, migrant shelter.

The story was debunked by other news outlets after it was heavily promoted in the right-wing media and brought up in a White House press briefing.

A spokesperson for the city of Long Beach told The Washington Post that the copy of Harris' book was donated to the shelter by a community member as part of a city-wide book and toy drive to support young migrants. The Washington Post fact-checker gave Italiano's reporting four "Pinocchios."

Neither Italiano, nor a spokesperson for the Post immediately responded to Insider's requests for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider