Posts by Katie Couric

  • Remembering the Oklahoma City bombing 20 years later

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 1 day ago

    By Deborah Grau

    When T.S. Eliot wrote, “April is the cruelest month,” he probably didn’t know how prescient that observation would be.  In fact, so many tragic stories have happened during this month.  The Columbine High School massacre, The Virginia Tech shooting and just two years ago, the Boston Marathon bombing.

    And on April 19, 1995, the deadliest domestic act of terrorism in U.S. history took place when a truck bomb detonated and blasted through the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.  168 people were killed, including 19 small children and injured hundreds more.

    This Sunday marks the20th anniversary.  Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric revisits that day which changed “the heartland” of America forever.  In their own words, a mother, first responder, sister and survivor recount that fateful day.

     

  • The terror of Boko Haram

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 2 days ago

    By Kaye Foley

    On April 14, 2014, a group of terrorists known as Boko Haram raided a school in Chibok, Nigeria, and kidnapped 276 girls. The horrible act sparked outrage across the world and brought global attention to this militant Islamist group.

    The name Boko Haram, which roughly translates to “Western education is sin,” captures some of the motivation behind the terrorist organization. It began in 2002 when a Muslim cleric, Mohammed Yusuf, started his own Islamic school and mosque, where he taught a rejection of principles associated with Western society. That means no secular education, no voting in elections and the dismissal of concepts like evolution and the Big Bang theory.

    The school gained influence in northeastern Nigeria and eventually became a recruiting site for jihadis. In 2009, Boko Haram carried out militarized attacks against police stations and some government buildings. Yusuf was captured and killed by Nigerian security forces.

     

  • Rep. Nancy Pelosi on 2016, her future

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 3 days ago

    She’s not ready to throw in the towel, by any means, and has some things to say about those in Washington claiming to represent the future of American politics.

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) sat down with Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric from her office in the Capitol building to discuss her views on everything from Hillary Clinton versus Senator Marco Rubio versus Senator Rand Paul versus Senator Ted Cruz to calls for her to step aside as leader of House Democrats.

    While a huge supporter of former Secretary Clinton, Pelosi stopped short of fully endorsing her candidacy just yet. But she did say Clinton is more than ready to assume the highest office in the land. “She’s so talented, she has so much stamina, she is so knowledgeable and she will be one of the best prepared people to enter the White House when she does.”

    As for her own future, the California Democrat says she has no plans of stepping aside from her leadership role. That day will come, she says, when her work is done. “I’m not on a timetable — I’m on a crusade, and I’ll know when I’m there.”

     

  • Manny Pacquiao on 'Fight of the Century'

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 3 days ago

     

    Watch what Floyd Mayweather has to say about Manny Pacquiao here.

    By Steven Shapiro Manny Pacquiao is a Renaissance man. The prizefighter, who is also a politician in the Philippines, is immersed in training for his upcoming showdown with Floyd Mayweather on May 2 in Las Vegas. The boxer also fancies himself somewhat of a singer and is even recording a new album in commemoration of the upcoming fight.

    In an interview with Yahoo global news anchor Katie Couric, Pacquiao talks about the epic event, which is poised to shatter revenue records for a boxing match. The total is expected to reach at least $400 million.

    “This fight is really big, really important, especially in my country,” he tells Couric.

    Pacquiao grew up in extreme poverty and began boxing early on to make money for his family. He says he would earn $2 for fights if he won, $1 if he lost.

    He’s a long way from that now. Pacquiao will make over $100 million fighting Mayweather, though he says it’s about more than a big payday.

    “If I feel something, then I will tell you and say I’m retired.”

     

     

     

  • Now I Get It: California's water crisis

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News 7 days ago

    Four years into the historic drought in California , Gov. Jerry Brown announced mandatory water restrictions for the first time ever. The restrictions, laid out on April 1, ordered urban water use to be decreased by 25 percent.

    Of what the water crisis in California means for the rest of the United States and the world, Brown said on This Week, “The weather that’s happening in California … [will] show up in other parts of the world. And I can tell you, from California, climate change is not a hoax. We’re dealing with it and it’s damned serious.”

    Many parts of the West and Southwest of the U.S. are experiencing severe droughts as well, especially Texas and Oklahoma. And in many other parts of the world, people are suffering from water shortages , such as Brazil, Iran and United Arab Emirates.

  • California's water crisis

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 8 days ago

    By Kaye Foley

    Four years into the historic drought in California, Gov. Jerry Brown announced mandatory water restrictions for the first time ever. The restrictions, laid out on April 1, ordered urban water use to be decreased by 25 percent.

    Of what the water crisis in California means for the rest of the United States and the world, Brown said on This Week, “The weather that’s happening in California … [will] show up in other parts of the world. And I can tell you, from California, climate change is not a hoax. We’re dealing with it and it’s damned serious.”

    Many parts of the West and Southwest of the U.S. are experiencing severe droughts as well, especially Texas and Oklahoma. And in many other parts of the world, people are suffering from water shortages, such as Brazil, Iran and United Arab Emirates.

     

  • Rand Paul announces he is running for president

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 11 days ago

    By Dylan Stableford

    Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul made it official Tuesday, announcing that he will run for president in 2016.

    “ I have a message, a message that is loud and clear and does not mince words, ” the Republican told supporters in a fiery speech at the Galt House in downtown Louisville, hours after announcing his bid for the White House on his website. “ We have come to take our country back. ”

    Speaking in front of a backdrop that read, “ Defeat the Washington Machine — Unleash the American Dream, ” Paul said he is running because he has a “ different vision ” for America, one that includes a return to privacy, opportunity and liberty — and a return to smaller government.

    “ The Washington machine that gobbles up our freedoms and invades every nook and cranny of our lives must be stopped, ” Paul said. “ Too often, when Republicans have won, we have squandered our victory by becoming part of the Washington machine. That ’ s not who I am. ”

    The tea party favorite and libertarian Republican candidate joined Texas Sen. Ted Cruz as the second major figure to launch a campaign for the GOP nomination.

    Paul ranks fourth at 9 percent.

    Tuesday ’ s speech was designed to reignite that momentum.

  • Rolling Stone retracts UVA rape story

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 12 days ago

    By Dylan Stableford On the heels of the Columbia Journalism Review’s blistering investigation that found Rolling Stone failed in its “reporting, editing, editorial supervision and fact-checking” of its explosive 2014 report about an alleged gang rape on the University of Virginia campus, journalism experts are weighing in on the case.

    “The fact that you had the failure on the reporting level, on the editing level, on the fact-checking level, and on the supervisory level of the magazine suggests that maybe there is a broader systemic failure and they just haven’t had all four of those levels break down at the same time,” Kelly McBride, media ethicist and VP of academic programs for the Poynter Institute, told Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric Monday.

    On Sunday, Rolling Stone officially retracted the 9,000-word story, “A Rape on Campus,” after the review described in detail how the story’s writer, Sabrina Rubin Erdely, and her editors relied almost solely on “Jackie,” whose accusations rocked the Charlottesville, Va., school when they were published last fall.

    Last month, police in Charlottesville said they had found no evidence to support Jackie’s claims.

    McBride agreed.

     

  • Exclusive: Ellen Pao opens up after losing high-profile gender- discrimination case

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 13 days ago

    Watch Katie Couric's complete exclusive interview with Ellen Pao here

    HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” a series about hoodie-wearing hipsters coding for cash and dreaming big in the tech world, often feels more like a freewheeling fraternity house than a buttoned-up, billionaire boys’ club.

    As details of Ellen Pao’s gender-discrimination case against the prominent venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers came to light, the industry and the (mostly) men who fund it sounded as if they were a bit of both.

    Pao, 45, came to the firm in 2005 as a junior partner, with a résumé that reads like a Fast Company profile. She received a BS in electrical engineering at Princeton before earning both a law degree and an MBA from Harvard.

    What transpired over her seven years at the Silicon Valley giant, before Pao was eventually fired in 2012, reads like a soap opera.

    To learn more about Ellen Pao's story and her legal battle click below

     

  • UVa student unravels Rolling Stone rape story

    Katie Couric at Yahoo News with Katie Couric 14 days ago

    By Katie Brinn

    On April 5, Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism will release its review of the discredited Rolling Stone article, "A Rape on Campus."

    This follows the March 23 announcement by Charlottesville, Va., Police Chief Timothy Longo, stating that there was no evidence to support the shocking story of an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia, published by the magazine last fall. Ryan Duffin, a UVA student featured in the article under the alias “Randall” said he was not surprised, because he already knew the blockbuster article by Sabrina Rubin Erdely did not reflect the truth, as he experienced it firsthand.

    The Nov. 19 article focused on an alleged victim, identified only by her first name, “Jackie,” and her harrowing tale of a violent gang rape by seven men at a University of Virginia fraternity house. But in the days after the story broke, the details began to unravel.

    “The first response that I had when she told me [about the attack] was that I wanted to go to the police immediately with it,” he says. But Jackie wasn’t ready to alert the authorities, or go to the hospital, yet.